Call The VT Statehouse: No nuclear weapons in Vermont

F-35 jets can be made capable of carrying nuclear bombs, and basing them in Burlington makes us a target in the event of war. We don’t want any part of it.  The beginning of the end of nuclear weapons starts in Vermont.

NUCLEAR BOMBER FREE VERMONT — Call Your representatives, today!

Leave a message at 802.828.2228 and ask your state senators to co-sponsor the Pollina/Clarkson Resolution to keep Vermont nuclear weapon and nuclear weapon system free. Please leave messages at 802.828.2228 THIS MORNING for Senators Pearson, Ashe, Lyons, and Sirotkin: “PLEASE keep Vermont nuclear weapon platform free and sponsor the Pollina/Clarkson Amendment.”

Rep. Cina and Rep. McCullough are introducing H.R. 7, their Nuclear Bomber Free Vermont resolution to the House this week. Call the State House at 828-2228 and urge them to support H.R. 7, the Nuclear Bomber Free Vermont resolution. If you prefer to email, you can look up your Representatives contact here.  

LEARN MORE at our event this coming Monday, April 22 at 6pm, Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street, Brattleboro. 4.22 Event: Nuclear Bombers in VT?

 

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4.22 Event: Nuclear Bombers in VT?

Join Citizens Against Nuclear Bombers in Vermont (CANBVT), Safe and Green Campaign, and other concerned citizens in a discussion about the F-35 nuclear bombers soon to be based in Burlington. Dr. Ira Hefland of Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) is our featured speaker for the night. Come get informed on the bombers and what it means to have them based in our state on Monday, April 22nd 6:00pm Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street in Brattleboro. We will meet in the Parlor.

The F-35 planes will come to the National Guard base in northern Vermont this September. Nothing about nuclear bomb capability was brought up in the planning process that approved the aircraft being sited in Vermont. The first information the nuclear weapon capability and mission of the F-35 came to light in the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review. For example:

“The United States is incorporating nuclear capability onto the forward-deployable, nuclear-capable F-35 as a replacement for the current aging DCA (dual capable aircraft). ”  — (2018 Nuclear Posture Review, Introduction, page X-XI)

Learn more about Citizens Against Nuclear Bombers in VT:  https://www.canbvt.org/

On the website is a petition CABVT is promoting:

We urge you to support the resolution in the statehouse to reject the basing of any part of a new nuclear weapons system in Vermont.

All new F-35As are being built with the capability to carry the B61-12 guided nuclear bomb, a weapon specially designed for the F-35A.  Existing F-35As will be eventually modified to carry this 50 kiloton nuclear weapon.  It has over 3 times the explosive power of the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, which killed approximately 150,000 civilians.
  
Experts have stated that the military had long planned to make the F-35A a nuclear weapon system.  However, this fact was never revealed to the public.  It was only because of recent articles in the military press that referenced the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review that this information was revealed. 
 
Both of Vermont’s senators have said they oppose building new nuclear weapons. Our current President has impulsively made statements about wanting to use nuclear weapons.
 
The particular bomb to be deployed on this bomber is a so-called “dial-a-yield.”  Because the yield can be adjusted, military planners refer to it as a “usable nuke” because they think they can use it and not create all-out nuclear war. 

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Year Eight of One Radioactive Disaster

It’s been eight years since the horrific events at Fukushima changed lives.

If you’ve forgotten why we should still care about a disaster on the other side of the world, remember this: some of Japan’s nuclear reactors are the same age, make and model as Vermont Yankee and dozens of other reactors in the US — some with extended licenses and over packed fuel pools, on bodies of water so much smaller than Fukushima’s Pacific Ocean.

Here’s another challenge we have in common: what to do with radioactive materials. Japan says they’ll move dirt from the Fukushima location by 2045 — but no other town wants it either. Sound familiar? One proposal: use the irradiated soil as the foundation for road, embankments, and other infrastructure. The Guardian covers some issues here.

Not much progress on what to do with the One Million Tons of irradiated water, either. The ice wall is working imperfectly, the 1,000 tanks aren’t holding up, they are running out of space to put the tanks, and because there are NO GOOD SOLUTIONS decision-making is slow. Releasing it into the Pacific Ocean is still being considered — even though “a system meant to purify contaminated water had failed to remove dangerous radioactive contaminants. ” Learn more: Reuters on water woes

Brattleboro is the same distance from VT Yankee as the town of Namie is from the Fukushima reactors. Although the government said Namie is safe for residents to return, only 875 of the 17,000 residents have done so.

“We were driven out of our community, and had it destroyed,” he said. “We asked the town and the prefecture to re-create a community for us, away from home, but we were not listened to.”

“The elderly who come back feel pessimism and depression. The biggest tragedy now is the high rate of suicides.”

The Olympics are being held in Japan in 2020. Softball games will be held in the Fukushima province, and there is even talk of the the Olympic torch starting from Fukushima. Put on a happy face, Fukushima! Show the world how we’ve beat this thing! After all, we want to build some new nuclear reactors!

If the plight of humans does not move you, but $ signs do, consider this: Think tanks put costs between $315 billion and $728 billion. 

This month, Greenpeace published an in-depth report on the radiation risks and human rights violations resulting from continuing disaster, “On the Frontline of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Workers and Children.” You can read it or  download the PDF from here: Google link to open Greenpeace report

 

 

 

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NDCAP Meeting POSTPONED to Jan. 31

The agenda for Nuclear Decommissioning Citizen Advisory Panel (NDCAP) has been posted. The meeting starts at 6pm 1/24  Thursday January 31st at the Vernon Elementary School. It is the first meeting with NorthStar as owners of VT Yankee.

It includes, following NorthStar + state updates:
6:50 State of Vermont Role in VY Decommissioning: – Overview of NRC & VT PUC Decisions on VY Sale – State Agency Roles: ▪ Public Service Department ▪ Agency of Natural Resources ▪ Department of Health ▪ Attorney General’s Office

The agenda is linked here in our Event calendar and on the State of VT page here: https://publicservice.vermont.gov/electric/ndcap 

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1/12/19: Bye Bye Entergy

Entergy has left Vermont after 17 years. Ownership formally turned over to NorthStar for decommissioning yesterday.

9 years ago this week, Safe and Green Campaign organized then walked 126 miles from Brattleboro to Montpelier to say the time had come to turn off Vermont Yankee and switch to safe, affordable and available alternatives. They marched by day and gave public presentations at night, before sleeping in churches and host homes. Read their “Step It Up to Shut It Down” blog here http://stepitupwalk.blogspot.com/

As they walked, local media was full of the news that Yankee was leaking tritium … and Entergy was lying about it. Bye, bye, Entergy. We won’t miss you.

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PUC Approves Sale of VY to NorthStar

To the surprise of no one, Vermont’s Public Utility Commission has approved the sale of Vermont Yankee from Entergy to NorthStar.

VtDigger has a post here (by Mike Faher, updated on 12/7) and here is the Brattleboro Reformer’s article (by Susan Smalheer). No other in-state media that we have seen has covered the sale with any level of detail.

The PUC’s Order and Certificate of Public Good are too large for our website to handle. You can access them from the PUC’s website.  You will need to log on (or create a user name and password to do so). The link is: http://epuc.vermont.gov/?q=node/64/27332/FV-BDIssued-PTL

 

 

 

 

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November 2018 Update

Heads up! This coming week on the Vermont Yankee front:

1) New England Coalition’s annual meeting is Saturday, December 1 at Brattleboro Savings & Loan, 221 Main St, in the community room beginning at 1:30pm. Enter at the back of the bank. Ray Shadis will speak on the topic: “Carry It On: The Greening of Vermont Yankee and the Near-Term Future of Nuclear-related Advocacy in New England.” Details here on the NEC website.

2) The next Nuclear Decommissioning Citizen Advisory Panel (NDCAP) will be held on Thursday, December 6th from 6:00 to 7:45 pm in the Maria Lawrence Room at the Vermont Agricultural Business Education Center (VABEC), 11 University Way, Brattleboro. The agenda is here on the NDCAP webpage. This will be the first meeting under NDCAP’s new chair Chris Campany.

3) According to VtDigger, the Public Utilities Commission will decide on the sale of Vermont Yankee from Entergy to NorthStar sometime this coming week. The article is here.

 

 

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Robbie Leppzer’s film, Power Struggle, on VT PBS

POWER STRUGGLE:  A feature-length documentary about the grassroots citizen’s battle to shut down a nuclear power plant in Vermont.

A Film By Robbie Leppzer, In association with NHK-Japan. 86 minutes

Watch it on Vermont PBS:

• Thursday, November 1 at 7pm on Vermont PBS

• Sunday, November 4 at 2pm on Vermont PBS

• Monday, November 5 at 9pm on Vermont PBS Plus

• Friday, November 9 at 8pm on Vermont PBS Plus

• Tuesday, November 13 at 9pm on Vermont PBS Plus

• Friday, November 30 at 9pm on Vermont PBS Plus

Additional airdates of POWER STRUGGLE on Vermont PBS will be added to this page throughout the coming year.

For more information and to watch a film trailer: www.PowerStruggleMovie.com.

Like our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/power.struggle.film/

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2018 Nuclear Waste Tour

Environmental Justice & Nuclear Waste the road from New England to Texas and New Mexico

CAN is organizing a High-level Nuclear Waste (HLNW) Tour in New England to address the abdication by the federal government and the nuclear industry to deal with HLNW stranded at nuclear sites throughout the country. We have a ‘mock’ high-level nuclear waste cask and are taking it on the road to show people what an estimated 1,000 shipments through New England could look like.

The tour will bring speakers from across the country to discuss the issues of nuclear waste, federal policy, environmental justice and direct action.

Speakers include Kerstin Rudek from Peoples Initiative Bürgerintiative Umweltschutz Lüchow‑Dannenberg (Germany), organizer of the successful opposition to nuclear waste transport to Gorleben; Tim Judson, executive director of Nuclear Information and Resource Service: Leona Morgan from the Navajo Nation; and CAN’s Chris Williams and Deb Katz who will address the issues of NorthStar’s decommissioning goals including sending HLNW from Vermont Yankee to Texas. The Tour will focus on the industry’s attempt to create centralized interim storage (CIS) for HLNW in Andrews County, Texas as well as a second site in Hobbs, NM. Recently, legislation passed the House that would support this controversial approach and fund it. It’s important for people to know where their legislator stands on this industry driven nuclear waste and environmental justice issue. Additionally, and Diane Turco will address Pilgrim and Seabrook reactors at the Massachusetts State House and Pine DuBois will speak in Plymouth.  

Speakers will address the need to create a permanent solution for this toxic waste and how it will impact vulnerable communities. What is needed is a scientifically sound and environmentally just solution. Until sound science & environmental justice drive any disposition, HLNW must remain onsite. But is onsite storage safe? It’s certainly safer in dry cask storage than in vulnerable fuel pools described by the National Governors Association as “pre-deployed weapons of mass destruction”. To lessen the vulnerability of dry cask storage to acts of malice or accidents, the casks should be hardened, double-walled, increased separation between casks & earth-bermed to limit exposure. All of this is possible, but the industry and NRC refuse to acknowledge the problem or do anything about it. The nuclear industry is failing! Reactors are closing throughout the country. Interim storage is the industry’s attempt to resurrect itself—to claim that nuclear power is a “clean” technology.

Tour Events:

  •  September 18, Tuesday, 6:00 PM, Unitarian Universalist Church, 130 Main Street, Montpelier, VT.
  • September 19, Wednesday, 6:00 PM, Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street, Brattleboro, VT.
  • September 20, Thursday, 7:00 PM, Hawks and Reed, 289 Main Street, Greenfield, MA, NUCLEAR BLUES withThe Wildcat O’Halloran Band, “Downtown” Bob Stannard & Court Dorsey as “Will Nukem”, and speakers.
  • September 21, Friday, 1:00- 3:00 PM, MA State House, 24 Beacon Street, Rm 222, Boston, MA, speakers, music and press.
  • September 22, Saturday, 1:00 PM, Unitarian Universalist Church (First Parish), 19 Town Square, Plymouth, MA.

Speaker Bios

  • Leona Morgan Navajo Nation, an indigenous community organizer and activist who has been fighting “nuclear colonialism” since 2007. She is focused on preventing new uranium mining, nuclear waste dumping, and transport of radioactive materials in the Southwest. She co-founded and works with Haul No! (www.haulno.org), Radiation Monitoring Project(www.radmonitoring.org), and Nuclear Issues Study Group (www.facebook.com/NuclearIssuesStudyGroup). Leonais Diné from the Navajo Nation and lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico and will address the environmental justice issues inherent in the nuclear industry ‘s targeting of low income, people of color and Native American communities for nuclear waste disposal. She will address the industry’s plan to dispose of New England’s HLNW waste in a Centralized Interim Storage sites in Andrews County, Texas and Hobbs, New Mexico.
  • Kerstin Rudek was head of the Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz Lüchow‑Dannenberg (www.bi-luechow-dannenberg.de) which organized the protests against nuclear waste transports in Germany. More than 50,000 people joined the protests. She is leading the ministry of foreign affairs of the BI and is organizing internationally in the Don’t Nuke the Climate campaign (www.dont-nuke-the-climate.org). DNTC works to protect the world from more Fukushimas and Chernobyls and insists on no climate money for nuclear power.
  • Deb Katz, executive director of Citizens Awareness Network, (http://www.nukebusters.org) which was instrumental in the closure of four New England reactors, won a lawsuit against NRC’s Decommissioning rule, organized Waste Tours and Action Camps, will address the issues of decommissioning, hardened onsite storage at nuclear reactors and opposition to interim storage of nuclear waste.
  • Tim Judson, executive director of Nuclear Information and Resource Service (www.nirs.org), a national environmental organization . He has led campaigns on reactors in NY & MA, worked with whistleblowers, and represented organizations pro se in NRC licensing cases. Tim is also President of the Board of Citizens Awareness Network, and a co-founder of Alliance for a Green Economy (AGREE, www.allianceforagreeneconomy.org) . He also has a background in the labor movement, as a member, organizer, and research analyst.
  • Diane Turco, Cape Downwinders (www.capedownwinders.info) advocate for the immediate closure of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant.
  • Pine DuBois, environmental advocate, executive director Jones River Watershed Association (jonesriver.org/jrwa)

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9/19 Env. Justice & Nuclear Waste Tour in Brattleboro

Environmental Justice and Nuclear Waste:
The Road from New England to Texas

When: September 18 – 22, 2018.
Where: Burlington, Montpelier, Brattleboro, Greenfield, and Boston (exact schedule to follow). Brattleboro: Wednesday, September 19th 6pm at the Centre Congregational Church (Parlor Room), 193 Main Street, Brattleboro. Co-sponsored by Safe & Green Campaign. 
What: 
CAN is organizing a high level nuclear waste (HLNW) tour in New England  this fall to address the abdication by the federal government and the nuclear industry to deal with HLNW stranded at nuclear sites throughout  our region and the country. We are rehabbing our mock high level nuclear waste cask and taking it on the road to show people what a 1,000 shipments through New England could look like.

CAN’s tour will bring speakers from across the country and Europe to discuss the issues of nuclear waste, present federal policy, environmental justice and direct action.

Speakers will include

Kerstin Rudek
Kerstin Rudek was born in the wild years of ’68. She is originally from the region of the Free Republic of Wendland, the place where the German government in 1977 declared to build a nuclear disposal center. The strong history of protest and resistance have influenced her whole life, and Kerstin is active in the anti-nuclear movement since 1984. In younger days, she was more action-oriented, for example occupying the final deposit site of Gorleben and the loading crane for Castor nuclear waste transports in Dannenberg. Later, Kerstin continued to organize the protests against Castor transports, being head of the Bürgerinitiative Umweltschutz Lüchow-Dannenberg (BI, or Citizens’ Environmental Initiative of Lüchow-Dannenberg) from 2007 to 2012. More than 50,000 people joined the Castor protests on top of the German dispute about nuclear energy in 2010, more than live in the sparsely populated area (equivalent to five-and-a-half million people joining a protest in Washington, D.C.)
 
Now Kerstin is leading the ministry of foreign affairs of the BI and is organizing internationally in the Don’t Nuke the Climate campaign. DNTC works to prevent the world from more Fukushimas and Tschernobyls and insists on no climate money for nuclear power, as it is too dangerous, too dirty, too expensive, too slow, and violates human rights and the principles of climate justice.
Kerstin has raised 6 adorable children, and loves to swim and bike and spend time with family and friends in nature.
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